About Nutrition Services

  • Good nutrition and learning go hand in hand!

    The Nutrition Services department is made up of a team of food and nutrition professionals that are dedicated to students' health, well-being, and ability to learn. We support learning by promoting healthy habits for lifelong nutrition and fitness practices.

    Meals, foods, and beverages sold or served at schools meet state and federal requirements which are based on the USDA Dietary Guidelines. We provide students with access to a variety of affordable and appealing foods that meet the health and nutrition needs of students.

Nutrition Services Classified Employee of the Year

  • female employee holding flowers and balloonsStephanie has been part of the Azusa Food services team for 5 years. She started as a food service substitute and because of her dedication and hard work she has moved her way up to a permanent position. During this time she has gone above and beyond to provide students with nutritious meals and incredible customer service. She is currently involved with the fresh fruit and vegetable program at Murray interacting with students and sharing exotic fruits and vegetables.

    We are very proud and honored to have Stephanie represent the food services team as the employee of the year. Thank you Stephanie for all your dedication to the students, staff, and families of Azusa.

Healthy Lifestyle

  • The winning recipe for a healthy lifestyle includes a combination of both good nutrition and physical activity. Your body needs a variety of nutrient-rich foods to grow and prevent illness. And your body also needs to move and exercise every day.

    Key things you need to know about leading a healthy lifestyle are:

    • Eat a healthy diet that includes fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain products
    • Control portion sizes and never "supersize"
    • Get active for at least 60 minutes, five times a week for ages 6-18
    • Avoid tobacco and illegal drugs all together

    Well-nourished students have higher test scores, increased school attendance, improved concentration, and improved classroom behavior. Students, who are physically fit, sleep better and are better able to handle the physical and emotional challenges that they encounter during the day.

    Sports Nutrition 

    School-aged athletes need to energize their bodies with good nutrition if they hope to perform at their best. Whether it's playing football, swimming, or jogging, athletes need to eat a nutritious, balanced diet to fuel their bodies. Good nutrition, like any sporting event, has basic ground rules and nothing affects your ability to compete more than good nutrition.

    Eating the right foods helps you stay physically fit and reach your optimum performance. To reach your highest potential and maintain a winning edge, all of your body systems must be perfectly tuned using proper nutrition.

    Eat a variety of Healthy Foods and stay Hydrated. The young bodies of student-athletes are still growing. It is important to nourish that growth and fuel the demands of strenuous exercise and organized sports.

    That translates into eating a variety of foods every day - grains, vegetables, fruits, beans, lean meats, and low-fat dairy products. The base of the diet should come from carbohydrates in the form of starches and sugars. Fluids, especially water, are also important to the winning combination. Dehydration can stop even the finest athlete from playing his or her best game.

    Eat enough energy, protein, vitamins, minerals and fiber. 

    • Choose lots of brightly colored Fruits and Vegetables.
    • Get plenty of Calcium. Calcium helps build healthy bones.
    • Iron is important. Iron helps carry oxygen throughout the body. Iron-rich foods include red meat, chicken, tuna, salmon, eggs, dried fruits, leafy green vegetables, and whole grains.
    • Protein for strength. Protein can help build muscles, along with regular training and exercise. Protein-rich foods include fish, lean red meat and poultry, dairy products, nuts, soy products, and peanut butter.
    • Smart Carbohydrates: Carbohydrates or "carbs" provide energy for the body and are an important source of fuel for young athletics. However, there is no need for "carb loading" before a big game. Choose carbohydrates in whole-grain foods that are less processed and high in fiber, like pasta, brown rice, whole-grain bread, and cereal. Fiber also helps lower cholesterol and may help prevent diabetes and heart disease.
    • Water, and staying properly hydrated, is key to an athlete’s success.

    Without the right foods, even physical conditioning and expert coaching aren't enough to push you to be your best. Good nutrition must be a key part of your training program for you to succeed.

     

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Wellness Policy

  • AUSD has developed a Wellness Policy that is focused on improving the health of students. The policy was developed by the health and wellness advisory council that includes teachers, parents, administrators, and the district nurse.

    Balance is essential for any Wellness Policy. Key areas include:

    • Nutrition Education
    • Physical activity
    • Other school-based activities designed to promote student wellness.

    View or download the AUSD Wellness Policy. 

Contact Us

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Nondiscrimination Statement

  • In accordance with Federal civil rights law and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) civil rights regulations and policies, the USDA, its Agencies, offices, and employees, and institutions participating in or administering USDA programs are prohibited from discriminating based on race, color, national origin, sex, disability, age, or reprisal or retaliation for prior civil rights activity in any program or activity conducted or funded by USDA.

    Persons with disabilities who require alternative means of communication for program information (e.g. Braille, large print, audiotape, American Sign Language, etc.), should contact the Agency (State or local) where they applied for benefits. Individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing or have speech disabilities may contact USDA through the Federal Relay Service at (800) 877-8339. Additionally, program information may be made available in languages other than English.

    To file a program complaint of discrimination, complete the USDA Program Discrimination Complaint Form, (AD-3027) found online at:  https://www.usda.gov/sites/default/files/documents/usda-program-discrimination-complaint-form.pdf, and at any USDA office, or write a letter addressed to USDA and provide in the letter all of the information requested in the form. To request a copy of the complaint form, call (866) 632-9992. Submit your completed form or letter to USDA by:

    (1)   mail: U.S. Department of Agriculture
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights
    1400 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, D.C. 20250-9410;

    (2)   fax: (202) 690-7442; or (3)  email: program.intake@usda.gov.

     

    Non-Discrimination